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Scientific Program: Tuesday Morning Highlights

BY: James Baran
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posted on June 9, 2009

Tuesday Morning Highlights
Note: The titles of sessions addressing the theme “Food Science from Producer to Consumer” are indicated in green.

Sunrise Sessions

Nanoscale science for food: A primer
Session 175, Tuesday, 7–8 a.m.
Room 207D
Track: Science Fundamentals

Nanoscale science and technology is rapidly advancing and demonstrating great potential for applications in the food manufacturing industry. This session will describe the fundamental concepts of science, engineering, and technology at the nanoscale level and discuss the potential impacts, both positive and negative. The focus will be on recent developments in applications in the food and ingredient industry and their benefits to the consumer. Further, the symposium will give a perspective on the potential risks and challenges facing nanoscale research.

What Is NRI Panel looking for in your proposal?
Session 176, Tuesday, 7–8 a.m.
Room 207C

Grant programs of the Cooperative State Research Education, and Extension Service (CSREES)-USDA National Research Initiative, especially the Improving Food Quality and Value, Bioactive Food Components for Optimal Health, and Food Safety programs, are of high relevance to the food science and nutrition community. Potential grant applicants are welcome to learn more about the peer review process and attributes of a winning proposal. CSREES will feature an introduction to the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative and the perspectives of a panel manager, a young investigator, and a recent grantee.

New Products & Technologies

New process technologies
Session 226, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–12:05 p.m.
Room 201AB
Track: New Products & Technologies

Topics include:
• Wave 6000/420: Ultimate high-pressure processing industrial equipment for very high-volume food production environments
• Surface pasteurization of particulate food items with controlled condensation pasteurization CCP
• Peroxyacetic acid–based commercial sterilant for low-acid aseptic filling
• Global Fresh Foods commercializing controlled atmosphere technology for distribution packaging of fresh seafood and other oxidatively labile perishables
• High temperature natural antioxidant improves soy oil for frying
• Minimally processed soluble dietary fiber for health and wellness foods design and reformulation

Panel Discussions

Food processing in the Indian subcontinent: Issues and options
Session 189, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 207D
Track: Professional and Business Development

As of late, the food processing sector has been identified as one of the key growth areas in the Indian subcontinent. However, it remains constrained and largely unexploited, resulting in wasted resources and lost opportunities. The first two panelists will focus on how global harmonization of regulations and food security are integral to any developments in food processing and value addition in developing and developed countries. This will be followed by specific examples from two developing countries that highlight and illustrate the need for technological innovations and a coordinated strategy to help alleviate some of the problems faced by the food chain in achieving growth and sustainability.

The economic dilemma of research
Session 191, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 209AB
Track: Professional and Business Development

How should the design process be approached? Is it worth the investment risk of my research dollars? How can I get all that I need with my limited research dollars? The tools available to the marketer, researcher, or product development professional to learn about their product and its interactions with the consumer are diverse. When budgets are limited, the questions arise from throughout the organization as to what is necessary to get to launch. Each research method brings its own benefits, but there are ways to expand the output of the methods or integrate methods to stretch the budget without totally risking the knowledge gained and project progress. This session will focus on taking a holistic approach to integrating research tools to build a comprehensive research plan that maximizes your research budget. Experts within design and statistics, integration of product information and research tools, and quantitative and qualitative learning will review the opportunities within their individual areas and how they can be integrated to gain more insight with fewer dollars. The panel will then open for questions and discussion on real industry dilemmas, putting forward possible solutions and opportunities.

Roundtable

Sharing approaches to teaching food chemistry and food analysis
Session 213, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Ballroom A
Track: Student Programming

Approaches to learning and teaching are changing constantly. Exchanging information about innovative approaches among selected food science programs that teach the laboratory sections of two core courses in the food science curriculum is highly valuable so that professors can stay up-to-date with current approaches. In this roundtable session, participants will have a chance to discuss and share different approaches to teaching food chemistry and food analysis. In addition, participants will share the thoughts and goals that go into the development of syllabi for food chemistry and analysis courses, including the time limitations and the need to cover a large amount of content.

Symposia

Carbohydrates and health
Session 182, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 204C
Track: Science Fundamentals

Indigestible carbohydrates, including resistant starch, are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine but have complete or partial fermentation in the large intestine. Consumption of indigestible carbohydrates by humans has been shown to result in decreased glycemic response in healthy individuals, decreased glycemic response in diabetics, and increased insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals. This session will discuss the importance of indigestible carbohydrates—including resistant starch—on disposition index, which can predict the development of type 2 diabetes, fat oxidation, and weight management.

Advances in the fermentation of raw dry sausages
Session 183, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 207B
Track: Applied Science

Several hundred different types of raw, fermented sausages are available in Europe, many of which are only partly known outside Europe. At the same time, the majority of the actual research in this field is carried out there. It is the aim of this session to provide an overview about the varieties, the production, and the sensorial characteristics, as well as the latest advances of research related to this kind of product.

Antioxidants and health: Assessment of efficacy
Session 184, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 201AB
Track: Science Fundamentals

Today’s consumer is bombarded with many products touting high antioxidant levels. How does one know if this is true? Furthermore, how does one know if this is of any benefit? This session will discuss some of the evaluation schemes that can be used to determine the answer to both of these questions. Topics will include discussion of in vitro and in vivo techniques, as well as myriad chemical tests, such as oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), tetraethylammonium chloride (TEAC), and so on.

Teaching food chemistry and food analysis: Approaches, commonalities, and differences
Session 185, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Ballroom A
Track: Student Programming

This session will describe innovative approaches to teaching food chemistry and food analysis lectures. Attendees will be familiarized with current course requirements as well as the expectations set by the Food Chemistry Division regarding the instruction of these courses. Participants will discover the thoughts and goals that go into the development of food chemistry and food analysis syllabi, including the time limitations and the need to cover a large amount of content.

Assumptions and artifacts in destruction kinetics measurement: Part 1
Session 186, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 208AB
Track: Science Fundamentals

Recent research has uncovered previously unknown limitations in the use of special apparatus and actual processes to generate microbial or biochemical destruction data. This session will focus on the problems that could befall an investigator when extracting destruction data from various apparatus and processes, the inherent assumptions made when these are used, and what happens when those assumptions are not met. The session also includes a look at the appropriate statistical analyses for examining the data generated.

Recent research findings on internalization of pathogens in fresh produce and control strategies
Session 187, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 205AB
Track: Applied Science

This symposium will explore current advances in research on internalization of pathogens and the interaction of pathogens with plant tissues. The symposium will also explore various factors that contribute to internalization of pathogens, such as disease condition, mechanical disruption, and presence of natural microflora. Control of pathogen internalization at the farm level will be addressed. In addition, use of best practices and good agricultural practices that limit contamination of fresh produce in the farm will be discussed. Presenters also will discuss the intervention options available for control of internalized pathogens. Since washing the fresh produce can be ineffective against internalized pathogens, other options such as irradiation will be addressed.

ift09d3ses_sciprogphoto1_kf Water sustainability: Local and global solutions for water quality and conservation in the produce supply chain—from farm to fork
Session 188, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 206AB
Track: Applied Science

There are a number of options to address water scarcity. This symposium will provide an overview of the current challenges to protection and conservation of water in the food supply chain from farm to fork and an understanding of water sustainability and the water footprint of the produce supply chain. In addition, it will provide effective strategies, best practices, and technology innovations at the grower, processor, and restaurant levels with local and global perspectives that are instrumental to protecting and conserving water across the supply chain.

Development of innovative and health-promoting marama bean products targeting international niche markets
Session 190, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 207C
Track: New Products & Technologies

A multidisciplinary team consisting of scientists, anthropologists, and economists developed niche market products from the marama bean (Tylosema esculentum). This is an underutilized crop native to Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa and forms part of the diet of indigenous populations. It is an excellent source of good quality protein (30–39%) and oil (35–43%), and is rich in mono and diunsaturated fatty acids. It is a source of phenolic compounds with potential health benefits. Market demand and consumer perceptions of marama products were tested. Various processing technologies were used to produce value-added specialty ingredients. These were compared with similar soybean products. Antimicrobial and anticarcinogenic activities of marama bean components were investigated. In this session, attendees will identify opportunities and challenges of developing, manufacturing, and marketing food products from underutilized crops involving all stakeholders in the value chain, using the example of marama beans in South Africa.

Novel processing technologies for food structure modification
Session 192, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 203AB
Track: Applied Science

A major trend in global food markets is a move to foods that are minimally processed, convenient, great tasting, and also contain nutrients and bioactive ingredients that provide health benefits. New technologies such as high-pressure or pulsed electric field processing are environmentally sustainable and provide novel and unique opportunities to develop nutritionally and functionally enhanced foods and ingredients without impacting taste and flavor. This session will highlight the latest research findings in this novel field of processing technologies for food structuring. Participants will be able to identify opportunities and challenges to structure and/or modify foods and food components by novel nonthermal processes.

Nutraceutical and functional foods regulations in the world
Session 193, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 202AB
Track: Professional and Business Development

Although nutraceuticals and functional foods have significant promise in the promotion of human health and disease prevention, health professionals, nutritionists, and regulatory toxicologists should strategically work together to plan appropriate regulations to provide the ultimate health and therapeutic benefits to mankind. This session on nutraceuticals and functional foods regulations in the U.S. and around the world formalizes an expert panel and provides a sequential descriptions of the intricate aspects including regulatory hurdles for the dietary supplements with a special emphasis on the marketing insight; cGMP compliance and generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status; U.S. Food and Drug Administration perspectives on health claims; and Canadian, European Union, Japanese, Australian, New Zealand, and Korean regulations.

Unintended consequences of simplistic nutrition recommendations: Implications for the food industry
Session 194, Tuesday, 8:30–10 a.m.
Room 204B
Track: Applied Science

Nutrition and dietary advice is often condensed into very simplistic messages to the consumer. Although these may be useful suggestions, they are not intended to provide complete dietary advice, nor are they tailored to meet the consumer’s unique needs. For example, the messages the consumer heard and acted upon surrounding low-carb diets, trans fats, and high-fructose corn syrup resulted in the food industry rapidly and extensively reformulating products, often with no net change in the healthfulness of the products or the health of consumers. This session will provide the industry with the consumer perspective on health and diet messages, insights on what messages are most effective to the consumer, how complex we can be in our messaging, and educational efforts and guidelines for how the industry can motivate the consumer to make healthful choices encompassing a broad range of health goals.

Modulation of the human and animal gut microbiota by dietary intervention
Session 211, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 207B
Track: Science Fundamentals

Evidence exists that relates obesity, Crohn’s disease, allergies, food intolerances, and intestinal bowel disease to the intestinal microbiota. Thus, identifying the major players that comprise this environment and then understanding the fundamental ecological relationships within this intestinal ecosystem and the interactions with the host are of major importance for biomedical and food scientists. While this ecosystem was difficult to study for many years, modern molecular tools now exist to understand this environment and the relationship between the microbiota and the host in exquisite detail. This session will first provide a critical overview of the intestinal landscape, followed by a discussion of current research findings from the most active and influential laboratories. Attendees will leave with new insights into how food and food ingredients influence human and animal health.

ift09d3ses_sciprogphoto2_kf Health benefits of citrus and their use as a marketing tool
Session 212, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 204A
Track: Applied Science

Research into the nutrients found in citrus and citrus juices reveals that they possess both health-promoting and disease-preventive properties. In this session, a review of citrus components and their health benefits will be provided and new research areas will be discussed. Citrus juices, especially orange juice, have had negative press because of their sugar content being a health issue for people at risk of developing diabetes. Scientific data will be presented and evidence will be provided that regular consumption of orange juice does not increase one’s risk of developing diabetes. Discussion will be provided on how consumers’ understanding of the health benefits that stem from incorporating citrus into their diets can be an important marketing tool to enhance citrus consumption.

Assumptions and artifacts in destruction kinetics measurement: Part 2
Session 214, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 208AB
Track: Science Fundamentals

Recent research has uncovered previously unknown limitations in the use of special apparatus and actual processes to generate microbial or biochemical destruction data. This session will focus on the problems that could befall an investigator when extracting destruction data from various apparatus and processes, the inherent assumptions made when such are used, and what happens when those assumptions are not met. The session also includes a look at the appropriate statistical analyses for examining the data generated.

Funding food science research: Who can you trust?
Session 215, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 204C
Track: Professional and Business Development

There has been significant public debate about the susceptibility of research to bias as a result of industry funding. The food science and nutrition community has faced similar issues, specifically that industry-funded research is biased toward results that favor the sponsors. This session will discuss some of the controversies surrounding funding sources and highlight recent examples in the literature and media related to food science research. Attendees will learn about the nature of the various academic-industry relationships that might exist and the possibility of conflict of interest. Eight principles will be presented that specify ground rules for industry-sponsored food science and nutrition research. The session also will present perspectives on this issue from an academic researcher, as well as a representative from a U.S. Dept. of Agriculture public funding office. Finally, the session will present the results of a recent study that examined the relationship between quality of research and funding source using the American Dietetic Association Evidence Analysis Library data.

Partnership in sustainability and social and environmental certification of agricultural products: The role of third-party certification for sustainable development of the global agricultural industry
Session 216, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 204B
Track: Professional and Business Development

A growing segment of consumers want to be sure that the environment was not compromised in the process of agricultural production. In addition, the rapid expansion and globalization of the food system are placing intense demands on environmental and social systems, damaging fragile elements of the ecosystem—such as rain forests, savannas, and wetlands—and causing large-scale soil erosion, agrochemical pollution, marginalization of small holders, disruption of land ownership structures, as well as infringement of labor rights. This presentation focuses on how third-party certification of farm, mill, processing, and manufacturing work environments, as well as the supply chain, can ensure balanced agricultural and industrial growth, with economic benefits fairly distributed among stakeholders.

ift09d3ses_sciprogphoto3_kf Organic poultry and red meats—microbiology considerations: What do we know, what more do we need to know, and how do we get there?
Session 217, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 205AB
Track: Applied Science

Surveys frequently indicate that consumers purchase organic foods because they perceive that organic foods are healthier. Are there less pathogenic bacteria on organically grown meats and poultry than on conventionally grown? What is the comparison of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on organic meat and poultry as compared to conventional? What are the knowledge gaps on safety of organically grown meats and poultry as compared to conventional? This session will attempt to answer these questions. This session will allow attendees to learn about the latest scientific activities dealing with the microbiological safety of organic meats and poultry.

Water and food safety: Technology innovations to reduce water contamination risk across the produce supply chain, farm to fork
Session 218, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 206AB
Track: Applied Science

Since produce is grown in a natural environment, it is susceptible to contamination by pathogens and other factors through a variety of means, including agricultural water quality, manure as fertilizer, animal presence in the field, and worker hygiene. Most recent incidents have been thought to be associated with agricultural water used in the field production and postharvest field units. One of the major goals of the most recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration Produce Safety Action Plan focuses on the prevention of pathogen contamination of fresh produce, of which water applications are a focal point. This goal extends to each segment of the produce supply chain, such as types of agricultural water used in irrigation and postharvest cooling, wash water treatments, and re-use for washing processed product at processor and restaurant levels. This session will provide an overview of the agricultural water supply chain and relative pathogen as well as other contamination risks across each step of the produce chain. Speakers will also discuss technology innovations and applications to identify and reduce these risks to decrease the overall potential for contamination of water used during growing and processing, as well as the restaurant-level handling of produce—farm to fork.

Irradiation of fresh produce: Commercial application
Session 219, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 207A
Track: Transformative Research

The symposium will discuss issues related to the commercial application of irradiation on fresh produce. Highlighted are the current developments in packaging materials for fresh produce, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s proposed changes in labeling of irradiated foods, consumer acceptance, and the challenge and opportunity for commercial application of irradiation technology.

Corporate-sponsored international skill-based volunteering in food production
Session 220, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 207C
Track: Professional and Business Development

This symposium session will present a successful model of international skill-based volunteering in the food production area based on the Kraft Foods experience. In 2000, Kraft Foods formed a partnership with the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) program, which promotes volunteerism to support peace and development worldwide. Beneficiaries include small to medium-scale companies, trade and industry groups, non-governmental organizations (NGO), as well as government and other policy makers who influence the development of private and public enterprise. Similarly, Kraft Foods Biscuits Europe has partnered with Planète Urgence, an NGO that actively works to develop human and economic capacity through knowledge sharing, since 2006. Through these two partnerships, Kraft Foods has been raising the internal capabilities of these groups through projects ranging from cake production in Indonesia to nutrition training in Burkina Faso. Kraft Foods has also been able to provide its employee volunteers with a learning experience and an opportunity for sharing their skills. In this session, the panelists will share the benefits of the program and the mechanics of how it works, as well as answer audience questions.

International connectivity to develop a global food science community
Session 221, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 207D
Track: Professional and Business Development

This session is organized to elaborate on the opportunities of improving international connectivity, and how we can help to improve the development of food science and technology by giving benefits to the individual members of any international food science professional organization.

How to start an open innovation program in your company
Session 222, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 209AB
Track: Professional and Business Development

In today’s ever-changing economy, businesses are continually challenged to develop creative product innovations, new sustainability concepts, and green manufacturing solutions. Companies realize that their internal resources may not be able to respond rapidly to new and upcoming product issues and subsequent competition, and have begun to open their doors to external sources for these solutions. The approach and method by which they open their doors via the open innovation program is the subject of this symposium. Open innovation is a process by which individuals, entrepreneurs, and small businesses can bring unique ideas, concepts, and products to the marketplace. This symposium will move interested parties in the right direction and provide tools to start a company open innovation program. Three successful companies will provide valuable insights and experiences to meet the symposium goal of generating a list of best practices for participants to apply when establishing their company’s own open innovation program. By analyzing successful programs from three top companies, participants working for large, established corporations will be able to assess and better position their company in the process; those in smaller businesses will learn how best to approach larger companies with their own innovations and move their business to the next level.

A 10-year retrospective: Celebrating the accomplishments of the Nonthermal Processing Division
Session 223, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 203AB
Track: Transformative Research

The Nonthermal Processing Division (NPD) is currently celebrating 10 years of collaboration, innovation, and leadership among the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) divisions. The NPD was founded in 1998 concurrent with rapid advancements related to the uptake of novel and nonthermal processing technologies by government, industry, and academia. In that timeframe, the NPD has served as the international forum for reporting regulatory progress and technological advances related to surmounting the challenges and impediments to commercialization of the newly emerging nonthermal preservation technologies. This symposium will provide an overview of the division’s many accomplishments and provide an update of important developments and ongoing initiatives related to advancing the nonthermal processing technologies.

Obesity: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and prevention
Session 224, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 202AB
Track: Applied Science

Obesity is a global health problem. According to the World Health Organization, about 315 million people worldwide are estimated to be obese. This symposium will focus on the epidemiology of obesity as well as new research in obesity prevention. There also will be discussion on obesity prevention through caloric restriction and the use of nutraceutical products.

Vitamin D sufficiency: Challenges and opportunities for the food industry
Session 225, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Room 210D
Track: Applied Science

In this session, leading scientists will review the important biologic functions of vitamin D, identify traditional food and dietary supplement sources, and present information on current vitamin D status of Americans, including children and adolescents. Industry experts from innovative dairy, beverage, and cereal/bar industries who are leading the vitamin D fortification of packaged foods and beverages will share experiences in obtaining regulatory approval and marketing these innovative products to consumers. The session should help scientists, regulators, and product developers understand vitamin D requirements/function and guide the development of fortification strategies and regulations to address a global nutritional deficiency.

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